Best Coast

Our first hike along the Oregon coast took us straight up a mountain; upon reaching the top, we were rewarded with an unreal aerial view of our surroundings. On our way down, we encountered a few others ascending the switchbacks, and offered them smiles and words of encouragement.

One frail-looking hiker must have been in her seventies, and was moving slowly with the aid of a walking stick. “Almost there!” we said as we passed each other on the trail. “Oh, I know,” she said, kindly but dismissively. “I do this walk three times every week.”

I want to be her when I grow up.

Here’s what else I’ll remember from our drive up the coast:

  • Our neighbors in the Umpqua Lighthouse State Park campground, who donated their own firewood when our campfire was burning low.
  • The tidepools at Cape Perpetua, littered with inky mussels, purple urchins, green anemones, and pink sea stars.
  • The dozens of tsunami evacuation zones we drove in and out of.
  • The jewel-toned seaside motels and B&Bs in Yachats.
  • The seafood at Local Ocean in Newport—roasted garlic and Dungeness crab soup, lingcod tacos, pan-fried oysters.
  • The world’s smallest harbor at Depoe Bay.
  • Watching the sun set over the beach from our hotel balcony in Lincoln City, wrapping myself in blankets to ward off the chill.
  • The drive through miles of wheat fields to reach De Garde Brewing, where we enjoyed the best sour beers of our trip.
  • The marionberry cobbler ice cream at the Tillamook Cheese Factory, worth every bite despite the inherent tourist-trap nature of it all.
  • The dramatic sea stacks at every scenic viewpoint, from Cape Kiwanda to Three Arch Rocks to all the nameless others.
  • The insanely fresh halibut fish and chips at the Old Oregon Smokehouse.
  • The weather-beaten brown clapboard beach houses of Manzanita and Cannon Beach.

On our last day in Oregon, we woke to overcast skies and drizzling rain, and spent the morning in gritty Astoria before taking the scenic route back to Portland. We stopped at the Coffee Girl, which is propped precariously on a drive-in pier (!) in the Columbia River, next to the old Bumble Bee canning facility. We sipped our coffees and watched the fog roll in over the water, trying in vain not to think about our impending flight home.

Camera: Mamiya 6
Film: Kodak Portra 400, Tri-X 400